18 June 2020 | Comment | Article by Belinda Moseley

Sorry seems to be the hardest word: Can saying sorry help during a divorce?

While we wait with bated breath for the UK Government to put into effect the proposed Divorce, Dissolution and separation bill, - and with protests and personal protection equipment all very much in the foreground of our daily lives at the moment - perhaps it’s time to look at how a very short simple phrase can make a world of difference.

In the middle of a divorce/dissolution or a dispute about a child or children, how much power would the phrase “I’m sorry” have?

A district judge, now retired, once commented that it was the most underused phrase in Court and he thought that it should be used far more.  He was absolutely right, it should be used - but only if genuinely meant and acted upon. Just saying “I’m sorry” won’t make any change for the better if the person saying it doesn’t put their actions behind it too.

It’s not always going to be the right time to say ‘sorry.’ Sometimes emotions are running too high, tempers too.  Sometimes even meaning it wouldn’t make enough of a difference.  But to those families out there in the middle of a split or an argument, just think about whether you could say it and mean it and act like you mean it too.

It’s easy to say “I love you” at the start of a relationship but sometimes impossible to say “I’m sorry” at the end - yet this could make all the difference leading to hot tempers cooling and calmer heads prevailing. 

So, the next time you are annoyed or angry with your ex about something, just have a think, could you say “I’m sorry” too?

About the Author

Belinda Moseley is a family law solicitor at Hugh James. She advises clients across the spectrum of private family law matters including divorce, cohabitation breakdown and children arrangements.

Disclaimer: The information on the Hugh James website is for general information only and reflects the position at the date of publication. It does not constitute legal advice and should not be treated as such. If you would like to ensure the commentary reflects current legislation, case law or best practice, please contact the blog author.

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